What Is The Adjective Of Agreement

In some cases, adjectives and participation as a predicate in Swedish, Norwegian and Danish do not seem to agree with their subjects. This phenomenon is called pancake phrases. There is also a consensus between pronouns and precursors. Examples can be found in English (although English pronouns mainly follow natural sex and not grammatical sex): A question of who or what takes a singular verb. Swahili, like all other Bantu languages, has many nominatory classes. The verbs must correspond in class with their subjects and objects, and the adjectives with the nouns they describe. For example: Kitabu kimoja kitatosha (One book will suffice), Mchungwa mmoja utatosha (An orange will be enough), Chungwa moya litatosha (An orange will be enough). The predicate corresponds in number to the subject, and if it is copulatory (i.e. it consists of a noun/ajective and a verb that agrees on the number with the subject).

For example: A k-nyvek ardek voltak “Books were interesting” (a: this: “k-nyv”: book, “erkes”: interesting, “voltak”: were): the plural is marked on the theme as well as on the addjectival and the copulatory part of the predicate. In the case of verbs, a gender agreement is less widespread, although it may still occur. In the French past, for example, the former work of the participants corresponds, in certain circumstances, to the subject or an object (for more details, see compound past). In Russian and most other Slavic languages, the form of the past in sex corresponds to the subject. Here are some specific cases for the subject-verb agreement in English: in Hungarian, verbs have a polypersonal concordance, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only its subject, but also its object (accusative). There is a difference between the case where a particular object is present and the case where the object is indeterminate or if there is no object at all. (Adverbs have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I love someone or something indeterminate), szeretem (I love him, she, or her, or her, specifically), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, me, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, her or her especially). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is agreement between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often refers more or less precisely to the person). An explanation of how French adjectives should correspond with their subtantives with regard to their gender and their agreement of plurality is also found between the subtantifs and their qualifiers and their modifiers in certain situations.

This is common in languages such as French and Spanish, where articles, determinants and adjectives (both attribute and predictive) correspond in number to the names that qualify them: modern English does not have much correspondence, although it exists.